Metastasis from Thyroid Cancer

  • Papillary and Follicular Carcinoma: Surgical and Radioiodine Treatment of Distant Metastasis.
  • Distant metastases occur in 2% to 23% of patients with differentiated thyroid cancer, and approximately 50% will die of disease within 5 years of diagnosis.
  • Pulmonary metastases are the most common, followed by bone metastases.
  • Patients with distant metastases, in general, have a poorer prognosis, but when metastases are small and radioiodine-avid, complete remission with 131I ablation is still possible in about 35% of the cases.
  • Children and young adults less than 45 years with pulmonary micrometastases identified by 131I scanning, but not seen on plain radiographs, have the best prognosis.
  • Distant micrometastases are best detected after total thyroidectomy and appropriate lymph node dissection of involved compartments.
  • Older patients with multiple extrapulmonary metastases that are not radioiodine avid have the worst prognosis.
  • Serum Tg levels and radioiodine scanning are the most sensitive indicators of persistent disease, although PET / CT may be useful in patients with negative radioiodine scans.
  • Surgical resection of metastases and adjunct interventions such as arterial embolization, ethanol or radiofrequency ablation, and external radiation may be beneficial in patients with isolated metastases or may be used to minimize morbidity and improve quality of life.

1 thought on “Metastasis from Thyroid Cancer”

  1. I am one of Rodrigo ARRANGOIZ surgical oncologist patients, at the beginning of 2015 He made surgeries of breast, thyroid. and parathyroids.
    Very interested in the articles related to his oncology research and experience.
    He found out at the very right time the burst, thyroid and parathyroid Cancer I was developing.
    He proceeded with oncological surgeries, giving me back health.
    It is my decision to share my testimony. Thanks Oncologist Surgeon
    Rodrigo ARRANGOIZ
    Teresa Schriever

    Like

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