Glandular Polymastia

  • Glandular polymastia, or accessory breast tissue:
    • Is defined as an isolated parenchymal mass:
      • Without a nipple-areolar complex
    • The tissue is present:
      • From birth
    • Usually becomes symptomatic under the influence of hormones during:
      • Puberty
      • Pregnancy
      • Lactation
    • This condition occurs in 2% to 6% of women and 1% to 3% of men
    • Common symptoms are:
      • Swelling
      • Discomfort
      • Restricted movement
      • Cosmetic deformity
    • Symptoms usually vary with:
      • The menstrual cycle
    • Ultrasound is the most useful method of diagnosis:
      • Demonstrating normal appearing mammary tissue
    • Mammography:
      • Often cannot fully visualize the area
      • Cannot differentiate between:
        • Mammary tissue and lipoma or lipodystrophy
    • Ectopic mammary tissue:
      • Is at the same risk for both:
        • Benign (i.e., mastitis, fibroadenoma, hamartoma) and malignant changes as orthotopic breast tissue
    • Carcinoma can develop in accessory breast tissue:
      • Accounting for 0.3% of all breast cancers:
        • For this reason, accessory breast tissue should be included in regular screening examinations
    • American College of Radiology guidelines state that additional views may be required to visualize breast tissue more effectively:
      • Axillary breast tissue falls under that screening recommendation
  • References:
    • Patel PP, Ibrahim AMS, Zhang J, Nguyen JT, Lin SJ, Lee BT. Accessory breast tissue. Eplasty. 2012;12:ic5.
    • Kogut M, Bidier M, Enk A, Hassel JC. Axillary accessory breast tissue – case report and review of literature. J Dtsch Dermatol Ges. 2014:12;499-500.

#Arrangoiz #BreastSurgeon #CancerSurgeon #SurgicalOncologist #Polymastia #AccessoryBreastTissue #Miami #Mexico

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